Common RV Problems You Will Experience Eventually

Even though not all RVs are created equal, with differences in amenities, size, weight, build materials, and overall quality and durability, they do share some similar “problems” that need to be taken care of. Just like any other product on the market, time and use (or non-use) affect the functionality and resilience of the entire unit or certain components. RVs are especially susceptible to issues since they are built to mimic a home that is able to be moved at any given moment. Even cars have issues due to intended use and are built specifically for transportation, when you add in features from a home, that is traditionally stationary, you are bound to encounter a few “hiccups” along the way. With “high end” recreational vehicles, the longevity of the parts that make up your RV may increase, but you will still eventually need to repair or replace these issues.

Water Lines/Water Pump Issues

Most ‘RVers’ typically make use of their recreational vehicles during the “warmer months” since not many people enjoy subjecting themselves to the cold unnecessarily. Since this is the case, most people “store” their RV for the winter months. When you store your RV, it is good practice to ensure your water tanks are emptied to prevent the expansion that occurs when water becomes ice, bursting lines or damaging your pump. Being that everyone occasionally forgets or overlooks “smaller” details, damage to water lines and pumps is a common issue that causes the need for repair work to be done on RVs across the nation.

Toilet Issues

When camping, there are many options for alleviating the need to use the restroom. While going in the woods or using a community restroom are both viable options when outdoors, that defeats one of the major advantages of camping in an RV, having your own private bathroom. In traditional homes, toilets can last a long time even with wear and tear due to “typical” usage. When you add the portability of an RV to the mix, the bumping and bouncing due to the road or terrain in the wilderness can shorten the lifespan of your porcelain throne significantly compared to their stationary, at home counterparts. Some common issues found with RV toilets can be, water not staying in or constantly flowing in the toilet bowl due to valve or rubber seal issues. Though these issues may seem like they are ok to put off, they should be addressed as soon as possible. Toilet issues can not only cause issues with your water supply, but can lead to water damage that becomes a much costlier repair.

Tire Issues

If you have driven any land based vehicle before your RV (if you haven’t, I suggest getting well acquainted with driving a car before an RV) you should be well aware of flat tires. It is safe to say that we have yet to perfect one of the most important parts of the most common modes of transportation in the world. Even common passenger vehicles, whose sole purpose is to get us from point A to point B faster than our legs can take us, experience flat tires and require regular replacement. Whether you believe it is a built-in obsolescence or just a lack of better a better option, tires are highly vulnerable to road debris, wear and tear from typical usage as well as damage from non-usage. Knowing that “daily driver” vehicles encounter issues with their tires though they weigh significantly less than most RVs, it should be no surprise that tire blowouts are a common issue with recreational vehicles as well. Though steps can be taken to prepare for or prevent some issues, like ensuring proper inflation levels, checking tread wear regularly and carrying a spare that is in good working condition, you are bound to encounter an issue with your tires eventually.

Roof And Window Issues

Being that RVs are meant to be portable, rather than stationary like a house, the roofs and windows are made of materials and assembled differently than your typical house. Since your house is meant to be stationary, the roof and windows are built from materials that are better suited for long term exposure to the elements. On your RV however, some aspects of each part needed to be “sacrificed” to allow for mobility. To keep the weight down, the roof of your RV is similar to the sides, rather than the traditional shingled or tiled roof found on a house. With constant exposure to direct sunlight in addition to striking low hanging debris (mostly tree branches), your roof can take some damage. As for your windows, in order to better absorb the constant vibration of travel, a sealant with a more rubberized finish is used to help prevent shattering rather than the typical sealant used on a house, that is solely to prevent leaks and withstand the elements. Though the sealant used on an RV is meant to absorb shock better than what is used on a house, like everything else, it eventually will succumb to the consistent jarring and exposure to the elements causing the need to be reapplied or even having the window replaced if the issue is ignored for too long.

User Issues

As was mentioned earlier, we are all susceptible to forgetting a detail here and there, it is part of being human. With that in mind, it is highly likely that you will forget to unhook a hose or take down an awning or even leave a slide-out in the out position. If and when it does happen, just know, you are not alone in this. This has made our list because it is a common occurrence amongst RV users and people in general. To help combat this, I recommend creating a checklist that you laminate and mount somewhere you will see before you can drive off. Include a grease pencil or dry-erase marker so that you can check off each task before you depart and erase when you reach your next location.

When It happens

The reason we know about these common occurrences is because we fix them. Here at Crossroads Trailers we have a highly experienced team of certified technicians that are ready and able to get your RV in tip top shape. We can service your RV from front to back and inside and out so that you can get back to enjoying your time on the road. If you are in need of a repair or service to return to or maintain the smooth operation of your RV, give us a call at (856) 697–4497 and we will be glad to help get your RV where you want to be.

How To Prevent An RV Tire Blowout

Nothing is more frightening then traveling down the road in your RV or travel trailer and experiencing a blowout. At that point, with adrenaline flowing, what you do to control the vehicle is of utmost importance. However, the most important thing is knowing how to prevent these blowouts in the first place.

There are several key things that can contribute to a blowout. Being aware of them and doing everything in your power to prevent these things will go a long way in keeping you and your family safe.

So here are the top reasons for blowouts happening and how to prevent them.

Excessive Heat

When tires heat up too much it means trouble. One of the most common reasons for excessive heat in tires are over- or under-inflating tires, driving faster than is advisable for your tire’s specifications, or overloading the tires with more weight than they are built to take.

Checking tire pressures and not overloading your RV or trailer before hitting the road are two of the easiest and quickest things to do to prevent a disaster from happening.

Once on the road, maintaining the proper speed specified by your tire’s rating is something that should be adhered to in order to keep you, your family, and everyone else on the road with you safe.

Axle Alignment Issues

Sometimes detecting axle alignment isn’t as easy as just physically looking at your trailer or RV. There are many parts involved that can throw off the axle alignment and cause your tires to wear and ultimately cause a blowout.

If you’re the handy type then physically getting down and dirty and checking all aspects of the vehicle’s axle is something that should be done on a regular basis before hitting the road.

If you’re not the handy type then make sure you get the axles inspected regularly at a certified RV and trailer service and repair shop like Crossroads Trailer Sales’ Service department. Click here to make an appointment today!

Overloaded Trailer

In the excitement of packing up the trailer and getting ready for an adventure, very few of us actually think about how much all our stuff weighs. Most people just think they couldn’t possibly be overloading such a big trailer but the truth is all that stuff adds up fast.

Overloading the trailer or RV too close to or past the vehicle’s suggested weight can cause it to be hard to control and ultimately lead to a blowout. Always being aware of how much weight you’re adding to your RV or trailer and keeping it in the middle of the suggested weight distribution can make a big difference when it comes to the health of your tires.

Tires Touching

Tires touching usually happens when there is an issue with the suspension. Making sure you check this out regular along with the axle alignment can also prevent an unfortunate tire blowout.

Incorrect Tire Size

If you bought your trailer or RV new then this more than likely won’t be an issue. However, it is possible that the tires on your trailer are not the correct size if you bought the vehicle used.

Always make sure that you check the vehicle information for the correct tire size and double check that everything is as it should be. Driving with the wrong tire size for the vehicle can cause blowouts.

Tire Pressure Issues (too little or too much)

This one is more common than most think. Driving with too much or too little air causes stress on the tires and can cause them to overheat or wear out quickly causing unexpected blowouts.

It is always a great habit to check the tire pressures on your vehicle regularly and make sure they match the recommended pressures in the vehicle’s manual.

Bad Tire Condition (too old or poor condition)

This one seems an obvious point but if you check the RV’s and trailers parked in any rest stop it probably won’t be long before you find a few that have scary looking tires on them.

Tires that are worn down, very old and brittle, or just in overall poor condition are just asking for a blowout. Check your tires often for signs of wear and tear. Also, even if they look okay but you know you’ve had those tires for years, you may want to invest in a new set of tires just to be sure. Tires get old and brittle over time especially if they are in a very hot or cold climate.

Being aware of all of the above and doing your best to circumvent these issues before getting on the road can mean the difference between having a safe trip or one that has more adventure than you signed up for.

If you’re driving an RV and you have a blowout there are specific ways to handle the situation that can save your life. Check out this video from Michelin Tires for more information on how to get back in control when experiencing a blowout.

Looking for your next RV, Travel Trailer, Fifth Wheel, Destination, or Horse Trailer? Does your current RV need to be serviced? Contact Crossroads Trailers to find your next RV or book your service today! Click the button below to contact us today!