Featured Units: 2018 Sundowner Charter

Find safety, affordability and stylish transportation in the all-new 2018 Sundowner Charter line of horse trailers.

Transport your warm bloods in spacious, secure, affordable comfort in either the gooseneck or bumper tow aluminum horse trailers by Sundowner.

From its rural manufacturing and distribution center in Coleman, Oklahoma, Sundowner has been single-mindedly producing top quality aluminum trailers for all applications. Its horse trailers range from small bumper pulls, to trailers with lavish living quarters, all with the Sundowner commitment to detail and backed by a 3-year hitch-to-bumper, and 8-year structural, warranty.

From frame to floors, gates to dividers, Sundowners are distinctive for their commitment to all-aluminum construction, including aluminum or stainless-steel screws and rivets for long-lasting rust-proof construction

Find all the great features of Sundowner trailers in the Charter product line, available at Crossroads Trailers Sales in two-horse bumper pull models and 2+1 gooseneck models.

Sundowner Charter Sundowner TR SE Gooseneck 2+1

The all-new Charter Sundowner TR SE Gooseneck 2+1 is a high-quality, functional, and flexible gooseneck straight load trailer – loaded with features and options for trailering your horses.

Sized right for warm bloods at 6-ft-9-inches wide and 7-ft-6-inches tall, the TR SE Gooseneck 2+1 boasts two 38-inch straight load stalls, a four-foot tack area and a flexible space the can be a dressing room, space for a cart or buggy, or room for a third equine passenger. The trailer rides on dual axles with radial tires

The all-aluminum trailer is both stylish and practical with 20-inch by 36-inch windows in the nose area, a high-quality skin in a variety of color choices and graphics package.  Also standard are full-length running boards, a spare tire and wheel trim, safety breakaway, four-wheel electric brakes, and LED clearance and tail lights.

With a walk-up rear ramp and 60-inch wide side door with ramp, the TR SE Gooseneck 2+1 gives equine enthusiasts plenty of options for transporting horses and gear.

At the front is a well-designed tack room with rubber floor mats, a dome light, six tack hooks, blanket bar, brush tray, and two saddle racks.

Padded airflow dividers separate horses and each stall is equipped with butt and breast bars, and rubber mats. Each stall includes sliding windows and pop up vents. Find two inside tie rings in each stall as well as 1 outside ring.  The spring-loaded rear ramp is rubber lined

2018 Sundowner Charter 2H Warm Blood

More compact and lighter to tow, the all new charter LE bumper pull is sized right at 6-feet-9-nine inches wide by 7-foot-6-inches to transport your warm bloods and their gear. The all-new charter LE is a straight load trailer with two large sliding windows in the generously sized horse area and practical forward tack room.

The all-aluminum construction makes this two-horse Sundowner Charter strong and light. This charter comes with a pre-painted brilliant white exterior with graphic package. Tow safely atop rubber torsion axles, radial tires, and four-wheel electric brakes with safety breakaway.

Horses travel securely in 38-inch stalls with rubber floor mats, padded airflow shoulder dividers, side slide windows, pop-up air vents, and padded butt and breast bars. Like its bigger gooseneck sibling, “Suncoated” double wall construction, dome lights, two inside tie rings in each stall and one outside each stall, make the stalls both safe and attractive.

The spring-loaded, rubber-coated rear gate ramp makes loading horses a breeze and the double 7-foot side doors provide a safe exit and access to the forward tack room.  The tack room provides plenty of storage and organization in well ventilated, secure comfort. Behind the locking door and window, find six tack hooks, a blanket bar, brush tray, sliding window, and two saddle racks.

Find the right Sundowner Charter 2H trailer for you – the spacious gooseneck or sprightly bumper tow – at Crossroads Trailer Sales in Newfield, N.J. With a full-selection of Sundowner horse trailers in stock, the experts there can have you, and your horses, on the road in no time.

Featured Horsetrailer: Bison Ranger

For work or play chose the strength, durability, comfort, and luxury-for-less offered by the Bison Ranger.

New for 2018 Bison Ranger models offer the best in gooseneck living quarters at a best-of-show price. The stalwart steel constructed Bison Rangers offer dependable durability, safe, easy loading transportation for your horses, while the living quarters are packed with the quality and amenities most often found on luxury models.

Bison Coach has built industry-leading horse trailers since 1984. In 2003, Bison Coach kicked it up a notch, adding living quarter horse trailers to their line of horse trailers.

Bison’s Milford, Indiana plant is also a “one stop shop” for manufacturing. While other living quarter horse trailer manufacturers were shipping the living quarter areas out for finishing – sometimes many states away – Bison committed to holding the reins on every aspect of its trailer construction – maintaining control over quality, while saving its customers thousands of dollars.  With Bison’s one-stop approach consumers also avoid the hassle of different warranties for different parts of their trailer. With Bison Coach, take the trifecta of value, quality, and hassle-free ownership.

Now under the ownership of Thor Industries, Bison continues to be the leading manufacturer of gooseneck living quarter trailers in North America, with a diverse line of aluminum and steel horse trailers, from basic and lightweight, to beefy and luxurious.

The new for 2018 Ranger aluminum-over-steel living quarters trailers by Bison offer the superior strength, easy repair, and durability that only steel frame trailer can offer. The exterior of the Bison Ranger features the superior strength of a steel frame, easy maintenance of an aluminum shell, excellent towability, and wide variety of options. Available in two exterior color options, each with stylish graphics, makes for a distinctive exterior and a trailer you’ll be proud to tow.  From the heavy-duty Bulldog gooseneck coupler with convenient hitch light to make hooking up easier, to the rear aluminum-constructed doors with double cam-bars for a tight seal, Bison Ranger trailers are built with convenience and quality in mind. Bison keeps your trailer looking sharp with ATP stone guard protection.

With an incredible variety of floor plans and options, it’s possible to build a trailer to fit your exact needs, making it no wonder that the Ranger is the top-selling line of trailers offered by Bison Coach. Two excellent examples of the options available in the Ranger line of gooseneck living quarter trailers are the 2018 Bison Ranger 8311 three-horse living quarters model, and the four-horse 2018 Bison Ranger 8414.

The horse area is loaded with LED lights above the stall fans for each horse, and mangers and aluminum air flow dividers on stalls two and three. The positive slam latched horse gates feature comfortable padding on each gate for your horses. Enter stall one through a side door and find an insulated stud wall and roof, and escape door to the living quarters lavatory. Tow two or three horses in comfort or use the first stall as a mud room. To the rear find a three-tier swing out saddle rack, bridal hooks, built in brush box, and collapsible rear tack wall.

While the rear of the trailer provides a safe and comfortable environment for your horses and gear, you will find unexpected luxury in the living quarters of the Bison Ranger. The Bison Ranger living quarter package features residential-style dry baths, energy saving LED interior lights, rustic residential plank-wood look flooring, full-kitchens, generous slide-out options, and a queen bedded cab-over sleeping area. Look for raised panel hardwood cabinetry in two finish options and upgraded window treatments.

The Bison Ranger bathrooms features a two-piece residential style shower with glass door, large linen closets, porcelain commode, vanity with plenty of room for storage, as well as a generous, mirrored medicine chest for even more storage.

Bison 8414

Smart design means the Bison Ranger has a spacious interior for long-haul living on the road. Consider models with slide-outs, such as the all new for 2018 8414 RBLBH for extended or family travel. This 41.5-foot four-horse trailer features a large living quarters slide-out complete with a full awning, sleeper sofa, residential-style galley kitchen with gas cook-top, large refrigerator, and a convection microwave.

The Bison 8311 provides comfort for all.

The 2018 Bison Ranger 8311 three-horse living quarter model assures that you and your passenger travel in safety and comfort in an easy-to-tow 26-foot trailer. The Bison Ranger 8311 is 8-feet wide with an 11-foot short wall for horses and a well-designed living area with optional big slide-out. Find a residential style double sink, two-burner gas stove, microwave and 6-cubic-foot refrigerator. The forward queen bed area features shirt closets and a linen closet. Loads of storage throughout the Bison Ranger 8311, makes it the perfect trailer to tow for weekend shows or traveling the circuit.

With so many ways to customize your Bison Ranger, there’s a living quarters trailer to meet every travel need. To learn more about the many options available with the Bison Ranger, visit Crossroads Trailer Sales in Newfield, N.J. They carry an extensive line of new and used Bison Rangers and the expert staff at Crossroads Trailer Sales can guide you to the best Bison for your needs.

Fun Things To Do In New Jersey In The Winter

New Jersey may be famed for its shore, glitzy boardwalks, and rolling farmlands, but winter brings its own excitement. In New Jersey, winter is time to get out and have fun.

Skiing

Hit the slopes at Mountain Creek Resort in Vernon. Less than 50 miles from New York City, Mount Creek is the perfect place to enjoy a “snow day,” weekend getaway, or a mini vacation. With 167 acres to ski down, a 1,000-ft drop, snowboard and tube runs, there’s plenty of opportunity for fun – and with the region’s most extensive snow-making system, little chance for disappointment.  With proximity to metropolitan areas and quality skiing, consider a weekday escape to avoid crowds, or check in for an extended stay slope side at the resort’s lodge or indulge in a luxury condo rental.

Perfect for families, Campgaw Mountain Ski Resort in Bergen, N.J., offers extensive areas for beginners and the smallest skiers. The county-owned ski area has one major slope, but five beginner and intermediate trails and a big “bunny” area.  There are six 800-ft tubing runs. Campgaw Mountain bills itself as the best place in New Jersey for anyone new to skiing.

Snowshoeing

New Jersey is a great place to try out the fastest growing winter sport in the world, snowshoeing. Great locations to burn some calories while enjoying the great outdoors are plentiful in New Jersey.

High Point Cross Country Ski Resorts offers five miles of trails exclusively for snowshoeing. The center’s longest path, Monument Trail gains 500 feet in elevation and rewards hikers with a view of the Catskills and Poconos in the distance. The Delaware Water Gap National Recreation area provides miles of great trails suitable for beginners yet challenging enough for an experienced trekker.  The Lamont Reserve and adjacent Rockleigh Woods Sanctuary offers the public 4.5 miles of trails through 200 wooded acres.  Be rewarded with wintery views of the New York City skyline when you rise to the challenge at Ramapo Mountain State Forest, which has trails with challenging climbs ranging from about 200 to 1,100 feet.

Ice Fishing

Just because the lake is frozen doesn’t mean the fishing fun is done for the season. Winter is a great time to try out ice fishing. When lakes and ponds freeze solid, it’s time for the hardiest of souls to get out the fishing gear. The New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife encourages anglers to engage in the fun, productive, and social sport of ice fishing. How, where and when are subject to weather conditions, but generally ice must be at least 4 inches thick for safety.

Some popular “ice fishing” catch are the chain pickerel and yellow perch, while the Division has stocked several fishing species in recent years, including walleye, northern pike, tiger muskies and muskellunge.  The division’s new Winter Trout Stocked Lakes program gives ice fishermen a chance at an icy trophy trout.

New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife suggests a few popular lakes for ice fishing. Cranberry, Jefferson, Aeroflex, Hopatcong, Musconetcong, Swartswood, Little Swartswood and Wawayanda in Sussex County; Greenwood, Pompton, Shepherd, Green Turtle Pond and Monksville Reservoir in Passaic County: Furnace, White, Mountain, Delaware and Deer Park Pond in Warren County; Budd Lake in Morris County, and Spruce Run Reservoir in Hunterdon County.

Ice Skating

Up and down the state, outdoor ice rinks are ready for families yearning to burn off some energy, couples looking for an old-fashioned date, and other people looking to enjoy some icy fun in the great outdoors.

The Mercer County Ice Skating Center is an “open-air, sheltered skating facility” open seven days a week through Mid-March. The center has a little something for everyone, with a full snack bar, fireplace and lounge area, skate rentals and lockers. Middlesex’s outdoor Family Skating Rink overlooks the lake in beautiful Roosevelt Park. Skate with an ocean view at the Jersey Shore “Ice at the Pier.” Located at Pier in Long Branch, New Jersey, the rink is scheduled to be open through President’s Day weekend.

Sweet Treats

Canada and Vermont may grab the lion’s share of the maple glory, but New Jersey has its own thriving maple industry and winter is a great time to get a taste of what “Maple Sugaring” is all about, according to visit New Jersey.

On Sundays from early Feb to March 25, visit the Tenafly Nature Center to learn how to identify a maple tree and about the maple sugaring process. You can even enjoy a sweet taste.  Saturdays and Sunday from Feb.17 to March 11 at the Basking Ridge Environmental Education Center learn about the history and centuries old process at the outdoor “sugar shack.”

Sledding

Take advantage of a snow day and grab your sled for some old-school adventure. New Jersey’s rolling hills make it ideal for families to find a perfect place to hit the hills. Many state and county parks as well as golf courses offer sledding opportunities with convenient parking, rest rooms and snack stands.

In Northern New Jersey, Liberty State Park in Jersey City offers thrills with a view.  Sled down the park’s hills while taking in the sights of the Manhattan skyline. Considered by some to have the best sledding in New Jersey is Jersey City’s Mosquito Park. It offers six acres of rolling hills and stunning views of the Pulaski Skyway.

In Central New Jersey, the Monmouth Battlefield State Park offers up a fun-for-all-ages long sledding hill just behind the Visitor’s Center. Thrill seekers from around the state head to southern New Jersey’s Fort Mott State Park and it’s steep sledding hill.

Wherever wintry adventures take you, Crossroads Trailer Sales in Newfield, N.J., can help you get there in a style in a new or used RV.

Winter Driving Safety Tips For RV Or Trailer

While winter RV vacations can be a peaceful, uncrowded time to experience the beauty of the country with its wintery white blanket, towing a trailer or maneuvering a motor home safely through unpredictable weather requires some preparation and patience to avoid turning a pleasure trip into a white-knuckle adventure.

Before You Go

Safety for a winter trip begins at home. Make sure you and your RV are prepared for winter travel – which means expecting the unexpected.

Winter road safety is not a splurge; before heading out on a journey where winter might mean snow and ice on the roads, make sure your RV is up to the rigors of winter travel. While there’s much you can do yourself, a certified service technician can make sure your vehicle is in tip-top condition. Let the winter experts at Crossroads Trailer Sales in Newfield, N.J. prepare your trailer or RV for safe winter travels.

If you’re headed for snow and ice, consider swapping out your tires for snow tires with greater grip.  If you’re not investing in tires, inquire about the right snow chains for your vehicle.

Check battery, fluids, seals, and wipers. Have brakes and lights serviced. Make sure your emergency kit is up to date and all components are in useable, working order.

Planning and awareness are keys to a safe winter driving. Be prepared to make a quick exit and a safe stop if the weather turns treacherous. Research the number and location of service stations, grocery stories, campgrounds, and RV Parks that are open year-around along your planned route.

On the Road

Take some driving advice from truck drivers, road warriors who keep moving no matter the conditions. The folks who teach truckers how to drive, Roadmaster’s Driving School, start and finish their advice with the most basic of instruction: slow down. Bad things happen faster when weather conditions are poor.  Your best defense is slowing down. Driving slower gives you more time to react and reduces the chance of hydroplaning.

Don’t be bullied or influenced by smaller vehicles, or those not towing, who are frustrated by your slow speed; stay steady and take advantage of passing areas by moving to the right to allow other vehicles to pass when the opportunity is available.

Allow additional space between your RV and the vehicle in front of you to allow more reaction time in hazardous conditions. Even if the road doesn’t seem slick, plan for extra stopping time.  Avoid last minute decisions to turn or change lanes and use your turn indicators early to give the driver behind you plenty of time to react.

Do not use cruise control when conditions deteriorate.  Stay in complete control.  Keep a relaxed but firm, two-handed grip on the steering wheel.

Go light on the brakes; if you start to slide, or there’s a hazard ahead, break gently and steadily to keep your RV in control or prevent a jack-knifed trailer. Retain contact with the road on accelerations by increasing your speed slowly and steadily. If you need to stop suddenly, focus on a safe escape route and avoid jerking at the steering wheel.

When you’re driving in the mountains, be aware winter can bring swirling winds and gusts that will make towing a trailer or driving a lumbering RV even more dangerous. Avoid proximity to other vehicles when possible and drive slow and steady.

Be seen by other vehicles.  Keep your lights on low while on the road.

Always have a Plan B.  Twenty miles in treacherous weather may be too much; be flexible and willing to get off the road. The cost for an unplanned hotel stay pales in comparison to the cost and trauma of having your RV pulled out of a ditch or the expense and danger of a jack-knifed trailer.

Before tacking any winter trip in your RV or trailer, let the service experts at Crossroads Trailer Sales in Newfield, NJ, winterize your RV.

Winterizing Your RV Or Trailer

Whether you’re preparing your RV for a long winter’s rest or getting ready to take advantage of smaller crowds, lower prices, and unspoiled wintery beauty with an RV trip, be sure your RV is ready to brave a wintery blast.

Winterize your RV for safe storage or safe travels. Winterizing done right means protecting the electrical, water, and living systems from freezing cold. Failure to properly winterize an RV can lead to costly problems in the spring when it’s time to awaken your RV from its hibernation – or a catastrophe on the road during a cold-weather adventure.

A starting point for winterizing your RV is deciding what you can do yourself, and what should be left to trained professionals. While skilled owners can do much winterizing work themselves, the Recreational Vehicle Dealers Association/Recreational Vehicle Industry Association recommends a RVDA/RVIA certified service technician to avoid damage to complex systems.

When it’s time to winterize, let Crossroads Trailers in Newfield, N.J., handle it for you. With over 20 years’ experience in RV service, Crossroads’ technicians are experienced to meet and exceed your winter preparation needs.

Ready for Storage

While there’s lots of advice on do-it-yourself winterizing, for many owners, winter is the cue to take the RV in for a deep service and thorough check. Even with leaving the heavy lifting to a certified technician, there’s much work an owner should do before tucking an RV away for the cold months.

First, decide what you should leave to the pros. The RVDA suggests choosing a professional saves money down the road in several instances.

Leak Detection and Repair

Even the most experienced owner may miss a small leak, that could turn into a big problem during winter storage. By pressurizing the water system, a technician will be able to detect the sneakiest of leaks and repair it promptly.

Water Removal

Luxury RVs have complicated water systems. A certified brand-specific technician will have deep understanding of water systems and won’t overlook any part of the distribution, manifold, and lines snaking through your unit. Technicians will also be able to distribute anti-freeze through the cold-water lines without filling the tank.

Empty Tanks

A little water – or waste – can turn into a big problem during winter storage. Let technicians empty the holding tanks and check macerator pumps and transmission lines.

Do It Yourself

Even with the help of a trained technician, there are many tasks a smart owner should take before storing an RV. Don’t let moisture build up inside; check the seals of your doors and windows, and reseal yourself — or put it on the list for your certified technician.

Clean out food storage areas and wipe out crumbs and any residue. Clean out the refrigerator and wipe dry. Leave the refrigerator door slightly ajar. Leave cabinet doors and drawers open. Remove batteries from remote controls, clocks and small appliances, and turn off antennas and boosters. Close the window blinds and shades to protect your interior from sun damage.

Batteries

Consider your plans for storage when it comes to batteries. If you plan to start the RV periodically during storage, plugging it in to power, leave the batteries with the unit.  If the unit will be tucked away for the long haul, consult your service professional to make sure the batteries are fully charged and stored.

Heading Out

Winter is an ideal time to take a snow-mobile loaded toy hauler out for a weekend, or visit some of America’s snow draped parks in the RV.  Visit a certified technician to make sure your RV is cold-weather ready, pack carefully, and be prepared for tons of frosty fun.

Windows and Doors

Keep the toasty warm in and icy leaks out by checking the seals on doors and windows.  Re-caulk before heading out or have the unit resealed by the service center. Consider beefing up your window treatments with panels of foil-backed insulation hook-and-loop fastened to window frames. What the temporary window covers lack in curb appeal, they will make up for with insulating properties. If the unit isn’t already equipped with insulating blinds or curtains, swap the existing coverings out with weather-wise thermal treatments. As a bonus, insulated window coverings will help keep your unit cool when summer returns.

RV Skirt

Before leaving home, consider assembling a cold weather skirt cut from insulating foam boards. Build the barrier from the bottom of your unit to the ground to shield tanks, water lines, and the floor. A purpose-built RV skirt will help, but won’t keep the underside of your unit as warm as the insulating material.

Be Prepared

Check the forecast before you head out. Have materials at hand to protect your water pipes and systems from extremes and pack a blow dryer for quick thaws. Bring along a safety compliant space heater for when temperatures bottom out. A fast-moving, violent storm means you may be snowed in for the long haul or face power outages.  Don’t leave home for a winter’s journey without cold weather staples, including extra warm clothing, a weather radio, extra blankets, full propane tanks, extra food and cash, and plenty of batteries.

Common RV Problems You Will Experience Eventually

Even though not all RVs are created equal, with differences in amenities, size, weight, build materials, and overall quality and durability, they do share some similar “problems” that need to be taken care of. Just like any other product on the market, time and use (or non-use) affect the functionality and resilience of the entire unit or certain components. RVs are especially susceptible to issues since they are built to mimic a home that is able to be moved at any given moment. Even cars have issues due to intended use and are built specifically for transportation, when you add in features from a home, that is traditionally stationary, you are bound to encounter a few “hiccups” along the way. With “high end” recreational vehicles, the longevity of the parts that make up your RV may increase, but you will still eventually need to repair or replace these issues.

Water Lines/Water Pump Issues

Most ‘RVers’ typically make use of their recreational vehicles during the “warmer months” since not many people enjoy subjecting themselves to the cold unnecessarily. Since this is the case, most people “store” their RV for the winter months. When you store your RV, it is good practice to ensure your water tanks are emptied to prevent the expansion that occurs when water becomes ice, bursting lines or damaging your pump. Being that everyone occasionally forgets or overlooks “smaller” details, damage to water lines and pumps is a common issue that causes the need for repair work to be done on RVs across the nation.

Toilet Issues

When camping, there are many options for alleviating the need to use the restroom. While going in the woods or using a community restroom are both viable options when outdoors, that defeats one of the major advantages of camping in an RV, having your own private bathroom. In traditional homes, toilets can last a long time even with wear and tear due to “typical” usage. When you add the portability of an RV to the mix, the bumping and bouncing due to the road or terrain in the wilderness can shorten the lifespan of your porcelain throne significantly compared to their stationary, at home counterparts. Some common issues found with RV toilets can be, water not staying in or constantly flowing in the toilet bowl due to valve or rubber seal issues. Though these issues may seem like they are ok to put off, they should be addressed as soon as possible. Toilet issues can not only cause issues with your water supply, but can lead to water damage that becomes a much costlier repair.

Tire Issues

If you have driven any land based vehicle before your RV (if you haven’t, I suggest getting well acquainted with driving a car before an RV) you should be well aware of flat tires. It is safe to say that we have yet to perfect one of the most important parts of the most common modes of transportation in the world. Even common passenger vehicles, whose sole purpose is to get us from point A to point B faster than our legs can take us, experience flat tires and require regular replacement. Whether you believe it is a built-in obsolescence or just a lack of better a better option, tires are highly vulnerable to road debris, wear and tear from typical usage as well as damage from non-usage. Knowing that “daily driver” vehicles encounter issues with their tires though they weigh significantly less than most RVs, it should be no surprise that tire blowouts are a common issue with recreational vehicles as well. Though steps can be taken to prepare for or prevent some issues, like ensuring proper inflation levels, checking tread wear regularly and carrying a spare that is in good working condition, you are bound to encounter an issue with your tires eventually.

Roof And Window Issues

Being that RVs are meant to be portable, rather than stationary like a house, the roofs and windows are made of materials and assembled differently than your typical house. Since your house is meant to be stationary, the roof and windows are built from materials that are better suited for long term exposure to the elements. On your RV however, some aspects of each part needed to be “sacrificed” to allow for mobility. To keep the weight down, the roof of your RV is similar to the sides, rather than the traditional shingled or tiled roof found on a house. With constant exposure to direct sunlight in addition to striking low hanging debris (mostly tree branches), your roof can take some damage. As for your windows, in order to better absorb the constant vibration of travel, a sealant with a more rubberized finish is used to help prevent shattering rather than the typical sealant used on a house, that is solely to prevent leaks and withstand the elements. Though the sealant used on an RV is meant to absorb shock better than what is used on a house, like everything else, it eventually will succumb to the consistent jarring and exposure to the elements causing the need to be reapplied or even having the window replaced if the issue is ignored for too long.

User Issues

As was mentioned earlier, we are all susceptible to forgetting a detail here and there, it is part of being human. With that in mind, it is highly likely that you will forget to unhook a hose or take down an awning or even leave a slide-out in the out position. If and when it does happen, just know, you are not alone in this. This has made our list because it is a common occurrence amongst RV users and people in general. To help combat this, I recommend creating a checklist that you laminate and mount somewhere you will see before you can drive off. Include a grease pencil or dry-erase marker so that you can check off each task before you depart and erase when you reach your next location.

When It happens

The reason we know about these common occurrences is because we fix them. Here at Crossroads Trailers we have a highly experienced team of certified technicians that are ready and able to get your RV in tip top shape. We can service your RV from front to back and inside and out so that you can get back to enjoying your time on the road. If you are in need of a repair or service to return to or maintain the smooth operation of your RV, give us a call at (856) 697–4497 and we will be glad to help get your RV where you want to be.

How To Prevent An RV Tire Blowout

Nothing is more frightening then traveling down the road in your RV or travel trailer and experiencing a blowout. At that point, with adrenaline flowing, what you do to control the vehicle is of utmost importance. However, the most important thing is knowing how to prevent these blowouts in the first place.

There are several key things that can contribute to a blowout. Being aware of them and doing everything in your power to prevent these things will go a long way in keeping you and your family safe.

So here are the top reasons for blowouts happening and how to prevent them.

Excessive Heat

When tires heat up too much it means trouble. One of the most common reasons for excessive heat in tires are over- or under-inflating tires, driving faster than is advisable for your tire’s specifications, or overloading the tires with more weight than they are built to take.

Checking tire pressures and not overloading your RV or trailer before hitting the road are two of the easiest and quickest things to do to prevent a disaster from happening.

Once on the road, maintaining the proper speed specified by your tire’s rating is something that should be adhered to in order to keep you, your family, and everyone else on the road with you safe.

Axle Alignment Issues

Sometimes detecting axle alignment isn’t as easy as just physically looking at your trailer or RV. There are many parts involved that can throw off the axle alignment and cause your tires to wear and ultimately cause a blowout.

If you’re the handy type then physically getting down and dirty and checking all aspects of the vehicle’s axle is something that should be done on a regular basis before hitting the road.

If you’re not the handy type then make sure you get the axles inspected regularly at a certified RV and trailer service and repair shop like Crossroads Trailer Sales’ Service department. Click here to make an appointment today!

Overloaded Trailer

In the excitement of packing up the trailer and getting ready for an adventure, very few of us actually think about how much all our stuff weighs. Most people just think they couldn’t possibly be overloading such a big trailer but the truth is all that stuff adds up fast.

Overloading the trailer or RV too close to or past the vehicle’s suggested weight can cause it to be hard to control and ultimately lead to a blowout. Always being aware of how much weight you’re adding to your RV or trailer and keeping it in the middle of the suggested weight distribution can make a big difference when it comes to the health of your tires.

Tires Touching

Tires touching usually happens when there is an issue with the suspension. Making sure you check this out regular along with the axle alignment can also prevent an unfortunate tire blowout.

Incorrect Tire Size

If you bought your trailer or RV new then this more than likely won’t be an issue. However, it is possible that the tires on your trailer are not the correct size if you bought the vehicle used.

Always make sure that you check the vehicle information for the correct tire size and double check that everything is as it should be. Driving with the wrong tire size for the vehicle can cause blowouts.

Tire Pressure Issues (too little or too much)

This one is more common than most think. Driving with too much or too little air causes stress on the tires and can cause them to overheat or wear out quickly causing unexpected blowouts.

It is always a great habit to check the tire pressures on your vehicle regularly and make sure they match the recommended pressures in the vehicle’s manual.

Bad Tire Condition (too old or poor condition)

This one seems an obvious point but if you check the RV’s and trailers parked in any rest stop it probably won’t be long before you find a few that have scary looking tires on them.

Tires that are worn down, very old and brittle, or just in overall poor condition are just asking for a blowout. Check your tires often for signs of wear and tear. Also, even if they look okay but you know you’ve had those tires for years, you may want to invest in a new set of tires just to be sure. Tires get old and brittle over time especially if they are in a very hot or cold climate.

Being aware of all of the above and doing your best to circumvent these issues before getting on the road can mean the difference between having a safe trip or one that has more adventure than you signed up for.

If you’re driving an RV and you have a blowout there are specific ways to handle the situation that can save your life. Check out this video from Michelin Tires for more information on how to get back in control when experiencing a blowout.

Looking for your next RV, Travel Trailer, Fifth Wheel, Destination, or Horse Trailer? Does your current RV need to be serviced? Contact Crossroads Trailers to find your next RV or book your service today! Click the button below to contact us today!

How To Choose The Right Horse Trailer

Before heading out to buy your first horse trailer or replace your existing one, it’s important that you assess your needs, consider the comfort and safety of your passengers, and make a budget so you don’t break the bank.  Horse trailers come in many configurations and sizes, constructed of steel and aluminum and designed for the long haul or for quick trips across the county.

Trailer, Gooseneck or Living Quarters

Horse trailers can range from very basic single-wide trailers with simple rear gates, to rolling palaces with padded stalls for your horses and lavish master suites for you.

The most basic trailer is a stock trailer, a more open trailer designed to carry a variety of livestock. If your trailer needs to multi-task, and long hauls with your horse aren’t in your future, a simple stock trailer with a few modifications may be an affordable option.

While stock trailers may due in a pinch or work for simple, short rides, for anything longer serious equine enthusiasts can look for bumper towed purpose-built horse trailers.  Available in a variety of dimensions, lengths, configurations, building materials and gate style, the smallest bumper-towed trailers can be towed by an SUV while larger models can safely and comfortably hold multiple horses and tack.  While added features can pile on costs, a well-built bumper-towed horse trailer can be a cost-effective choice.

To more easily tow longer, heavier loads as well as carry fodder and gear, step up to a goose-neck horse trailer. While a bumper-towed trailer connects to a hitch on the bumper of the tow vehicle, a coupler underneath the overhang of the trailer connects to a ball in the bed of the truck. The hitch arrangement results in a tighter turning radius and more control while backing up. Safety and stability for hauling heavy loads makes gooseneck trailers a great choice when you will be hauling three or more horses. Before choosing a gooseneck trailer, be sure your towing vehicle is up to the task.

For multi-day eventers and long trips, consider the all-in-one comfort and convenience of a living quarters horse trailer.  Ranging from spartan to luxurious, living quarter horse trailers pair up the convenience of RVing with the functionality of a horse trailer.  Most living quarter trailers will also include a bedroom, kitchen and dining area and enclosed bathroom.  For personal horse trailers, living quarter models will generally be heavier and more expensive than other horse trailers.

Configuration and Construction of Horse Trailers

Choosing the construction materials for your horse trailer is a weighty matter. Steel-built horse trailers are stout and heavy, simply repaired, and easy to maintain. However, they are susceptible to rust.  Steel constructed horse trailers are also the most affordable.  Aluminum’s light-weight strength has made aluminum horse trailers popular in recent years. Beam construction results in lots of carrying capacity for less towing weight.  Aluminum trailers are also rust free – but not worry free – as aluminum is subject to corrosion, especially from animal waste.

For a little bit of everything, look for composite trailers, those made with a mix of materials, depending on function.  For non-structural components, such as the roof and fenders, fiberglass is an affordable and durable option that keeps the trailer weight down.  Newer to the market is “rumbar,” a durable flooring constructed from recycled tires that doesn’t require a rubber mat like metal or wood flooring.

Straight or slant – or how the horse travels in the trailers – is a matter of preference.  In a straight load trailer horses enter from the rear and stand side-by-side facing forward.  Horses face the center of the road, standing side by side at an angle, in a slant load trailer. This is generally used for hauling more than two horses.

Knowing how your horse travels and loads is an important factor in trailer selection.  Consider if you need a ramp entry, rather than a step-up entry.  Many small trailers offer a basic rear entry, but if your horse balks at backing out, back and side exit may be worth the investments. Some trailers will also offer a forward exit so handlers can exit safely.

Whether you’re a first-time horse trailer buyer or looking to upgrade your existing trailer, the horse trailer experts at Crossroads Trailer Sales in Newfield, N.J., can guide you through the process.

Featured Units: 2018 Cedar Creek Cottage 40CCK

Stylish, spacious, comfortable, and towable the Forest River Cedar Creek Cottage 40CCK Destination Trailer is home where ever you park – for weekends, a season, or all year long.

While most towable RVs aim to be light and sprightly to tackle life on the road, destination trailers, sometimes called park trailers, are taller, wider, and heavier, and outfitted with residential finishes for long or frequent stays at a favored destination.

The 2018 Cedar Creek Cottage 40CCK takes destination living to a whole new level, with the most homelike finishes yet, vast open spaces and luxury living touches from forward picture windows to a rear, king-bedded suite. The 40CCK is 40-ft 4-inches long, 102.5 inches wide with 8-ft ceiling and three over-sized 7-foot tall slide-outs.

40CCK Exterior Features

Built on Forest River’s signature aluminum super structure, the handsome exterior features a stronger, thicker “true” pearl gel coat exterior. The “best of the best” in gelcoat exteriors, it keeps its high gloss longer than competitors’ less expensive gel “coated” exteriors.  A decorative front cap with molded picket fence completes the attractive exterior.

Arrive safely at your new address with included Forest River touches. The Dexter Safety and Performance package includes New Nev-R-Adjust brakes for improved stopping power, heavy duty axles with heavy duty link plates and shackles and upgraded tires on Dexter axles.

Step up illuminated porch steps made brighter by the functional and attractive mounted porch light, and enter the 40CCK through the thermal pane patio door.

40CCK Interior Features

Throughout the cottage find standard honey-glazed European beech cabinetry, Shaw carpeting with rebond pad, and Congoleum floor coverings. Coordinating window treatments, upholstery, and finishes are available in four options: domino, sandstone, gold dust, and raven. The high ceilings, over-sized slide-outs, large windows, and deluxe touches all combine to make the cottage truly homelike.

Open the patio door of the 2018 Cedar Creek Cottage 40CCK and enter the fresh for 2018 kitchen. A massive island that is both functional and fancy, is perfect for gathering with friends and prepping meals. An under-mount double, stainless steel sink with high-rise faucet is set into a pretty and practical solid-surface counter top. Underneath find ample storage, or add an optional built in dishwasher.

Keeping things bright is a newly redesigned overhead ceiling medallion with recessed lighting and keeping it cool and comfortable is a Create-a-Breeze Fantastic Fan with thermostat and rain sensor. Store all you need for a long stay in generous residential-style cabinets that feature self-closing, full extension drawers, a wooden silverware organizer, and loads of overhead storage.

Residential style appliances — including a stainless steel 19-cubic foot refrigerator, matching overhead microwave, and recessed, large stainless steel oven with Piezo igniter, sealed burners, and glass cover with solid surface handle – share a huge slide-out with a full-length pantry, creating a spacious and welcoming kitchen.

Dine in style at a standalone table and four chairs in another slide-out opposite the kitchen. The table includes a hidden leaf so accommodating a crowd isn’t a problem. Nestled in the same expansive slide-out, are a pair of matched leather La-Z-Boy recliners – the perfect place to relax after a busy day outdoors, and a delicious meal.

The forward living room that opens to the kitchen is cozy enough for a couple, but with ample seating and space for friends and family. A front La-Z-Boy convertible sofa fits under a bank of picture windows that bring the outside in.  At night, the sofa becomes additional sleeping space for guests.

Gather around the finely crafted, built-in entertainment center to enjoy a roaring fire and watch movie on the 48-inch LED TV with 12-volt Jensen Home Theater System, which includes full integration with smart devices including Apple’s iPhone, iPod, iPad, plus Bluetooth streaming audio, video, MP3 and weather band information.

Like all Forest River Cottages, the 40CCK, the center bathroom features 48-inch one-piece fiberglass rectangular shower with built-in seat, upgraded shower head and sliding glass doors. A generous vanity with solid surface sink, 18-inch circular flow porcelain toilet and full-length linen closet make this a bathroom worthy of full-time living.

The Cottage’s third, rear slide holds a king-sized Serta mattress atop generous under-bed storage.  The master suite getaway includes a mirrored wardrobe, residential dresser, and lots of deep overhead cabinets that provide ample storage for long stays. For privacy, a second door provides direct access to the outdoors.

Cedar Creek Cottage 40CCK

If you’re ready for seasonal living, long, relaxing stays, or to cut the ties with brick-and-mortar living, it’s time to consider the affordable luxury of Cedar Creek Cottage 40CCK living. Experience the Forest River difference at Crossroads Trailer Sales in Newfield, NJ. Tour the latest 2018 cottages with our experts and find your next home.

Featured Units: 2018 Forest River Hemisphere

When the focus is on family and fun, consider a 2018 Forest River Hemisphere. The Ultra Lite line of trailers and fifth wheels is stylish and smartly engineered, and while it may weigh in at less than other comparable models, Hemispheres are loaded with exceptional luxury and comfort, suitable for couple travel or touring with a crowd.

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